Who Can Benefit from Kettlebell Workouts?

For most people, a lack of equipment in the gym introduces them to using kettlebells. Much like the humble rowing machine and versa climber, most gym bros steer clear of the cast-iron ‘bells, helping you get an effective, time-efficient workout in, without having to worry about your kit getting pinched. This and the growing popularity of sports such as CrossFit and StrongMan have helped drive kettlebell training and workouts into the mainstream.

But it’s not always been this way. In the 19th century, circus strongmen used weights — original meant for weighing crops — to alter their physique, alongside training recreationally and for competition, which gradually saw kettlebell training rise in popularity.

On top of this, owing to their design, kettlebells are one of the easiest weights to move around during your workout in a short timeframe and can be stored away easily, from your car boot to your garden shed or garage. They’re adaptable to your strength and fitness levels, too. Fitness brands such as Rogue and Bulldog stock kettlebells that vary in weights and sizes — from 4kg in weight all the way up to a whopping 68kg.

Exercises such kettlebell swings can help increase your heart rate, burn extra fat and tone muscle, but where they really come into their own is in building strength throughout your posterior chain.

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